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Marvin A Sackner M.D. and Jose A Adams, M.D. Comments on Oxidative Stress Meeting Paris 2017

Jose Adams and I were pleased by the reception we received in response to presentation of our non-invasive technologies in 1) preconditioning to achieve 60% survival for 48 hours in a severe sepsis mice model induced by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which untreated gave 0% survival and 2) initiating conditioning one hour after injection of the same lethal dose of LPS to achieve 80% survival for 48 hours.

The technology consisted of a motion platform that moved the non-anesthetized mouse rapidly head to foot, a process known as periodic acceleration (pGz). The latter added small pulses to the circulation as a function of the frequency of platform movement to increase pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium. In turn, this stimulated release of endothelial nitric oxide, prostacyclin and other mediators into the circulation to preserve endothelial barrier integrity. We introduced a portable, passive simulated jogging device placed within a bed that non-invasively produced increased pulsatile shear stress by passive, rapid, tapping of the feet on motorized pedals at a small fraction of the cost of the human motion platform. We suggested that this technology might be employed in a clinical trial for human sepsis since there has been no treatment that has achieved such survival rates.

We reported application of a motion platform for symptomatic relief of fibromyalgia as estimated by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (F.I.Q.), with improvement comparable to pharmacotherapies. The passive simulated jogging device has not yet been employed in fibromyalgia but we would expect comparable or greater improvement over the motion platform. Here, our technology is beneficial because it reduces oxidative stress and inflammation. Further, we showed that a 30-minute application of the passive simulated jogging device in normal young and old volunteers, sitting and supine, reduced blood pressure comparable to exercise due in part to increased production of endothelial nitric oxide.

Finally, a highlight of the meeting was our acquaintance of Simona Cristescu who gave a paper demonstrating that expired ethylene could be an early marker of oxidative stress in human LPS sepsis, a measure that was new to us. This led to plans to collaborate which never would have come about without attending the meeting.

If you would like to be in touch with Dr Sackner and Dr Adams, please don't hesitate to contact antioxidants(at)isanh.com